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Ahmed Fakroun / Belle Epoque - Yo Son (Edit De Prince Language) / Bamalama (Edit De Lee Douglas) Album

Ahmed Fakroun / Belle Epoque - Yo Son (Edit De Prince Language) / Bamalama (Edit De Lee Douglas) Album
Title:
Yo Son (Edit De Prince Language) / Bamalama (Edit De Lee Douglas)
Performer:
Ahmed Fakroun / Belle Epoque
Style:
Disco
Released:
2007
Catalog:
ed-1977
Country:
US
MP3 album size:
1214 mb
FLAC album size:
2413 mb
Genre:
Label:
Editions Disco

Tracklist


1Ahmed FakrounYo Son (Edit De Prince Language)
Edited By – Prince Language
2Belle EpoqueBamalama (Edit De Lee Douglas)
Edited By – Lee Douglas


Notes


Original artists not listed.

A side originally released in 1983 as Ahmed Fakroun - Soleil Soleil.
B side originally released in 1977 as Belle Epoque - Bamalama.


Album


On this page you can not listen to mp3 music free or download album or mp3 track to your PC, phone or tablet. See also releases of Ahmed Fakroun, Belle Epoque: Click to release cover to see details: Distres. On the B-sides Bamalama, NYCs Lee Douglas chops an obscure Belle. Summer New Collection. Ahmed Fakroun. A touch of a Trevor HornMalcolm MclarenDuck Rock vibe Check On the B-sides Bamalama, NYCs Lee Douglas chops an obscure Belle Epoque Miss Broadway track thats very reminiscent of his own amazing productions for the Rong Music label. Sign me up Plays at 45. MP3 320 CBR. From The Album. We dont have an album for this track yet. View all albums by this artist. Do you know the lyrics for this track Add lyrics on Musixmatch. Ahmet Fakroun. 1 listener. Visit JoNo's Audio Delights for more info: marelease939010. Libya Balearic PrinceLanguage Prince Language Disco. On this page you can listen to mp3 music free By Prince Language. Belle Epoque. Original artists not listed. Ahmed Fakroun looked set to make his mark in world music circles in the mid-1980s when his album Mots D'Amour, combining traditional Arab instruments and melodies with electronic music and dance rhythms, was released on the Celluloid label in France. But then came the US aerial bombing of Libya in April 1986, followed by years of international sanctions, as evidence of terror links turned Libya's government into a pariah of the West and seriously impeded its citizens' freedom of movement


Video


Reviews:
  • Kanrad
I have a copy for sale in the US. PM me if interested. Both vinyl and sleeve are NM.
  • elektron
I am looking for this one, please message me if your are selling it. Thanks
  • Lanionge
yep +1, fingers and toes crossed there is anyone out there willing to pass this on, would love to spin this
  • Wnex
Just seen this posted on Facebook market place as it's banned here: https://www.facebook.com/marketplace/item/373028386869360/
  • Gavinrage
Seems like this blew up recently, is someone playing it? Glad I grabbed a copy a few years back, and no, it isn't for sale :)
  • catterpillar
Maybe because Ahmed Fakroun is touring..? Playing UK at Jazz Cafe in August 18
  • Kelezel
I would also like a copy :') hit me up
  • lacki
I would also very much like to purchase an edition of this vinyl if anyone cares to divest themselves of their copy.
  • Buzatus
I woulld be happy to buy this from somebody. If you wish to sell this just send me a message!
  • Nenayally
Anyone selling this or wanting to trade it please message me, thank you!
  • Agagamand
Another record blocked from sale on Discogs (like the Mr. K edit/re-work of 'Back To My Roots'.) Who actually blocks it from sale? Does Discogs need to receive a 'cease and desist' from the artist/rights holder? Also does its 'unavailability' make such records more expensive!
  • Fearlessdweller
Like this a lot, wicked edit with an Arabic feel, nicely!
  • Mr.Death
Ahmed Fakroun.Born in the Libyan city of Benghazi, he spent long periods in the UK and France in the 1970s and 1980s, recording a handful of singles and albums. Reduced to a mere mention in specialist music encyclopedias after Libya's years of international isolation made it difficult for him to market his music to the outside world. However, he recently came to prominence among obscurity-hungry club DJs when some of his early songs were rediscovered, re-edited and reissued anonymously. Ahmed Fakroun looked set to make his mark in world music circles in the mid-1980s when his album Mots D'Amour, combining traditional Arab instruments and melodies with electronic music and dance rhythms, was released on the Celluloid label in France. But then came the US aerial bombing of Libya in April 1986, followed by years of international sanctions, as evidence of terror links turned Libya's government into a pariah of the West and seriously impeded its citizens' freedom of movement. "When I look to my press book, I found the articles stopped in 1986," he told the BBC. "It was so difficult for me to be in two places at the same time". "To take a plane to go from my home town to any part of the world, I had to go across the Tunisian border to Jerboa, about 700km, or take a boat to Malta overnight, then [travel] the next day to the other part of the planet. Imagine the rest of the story." As it happened, record companies did manage to market Arabic pop to international music fans at that time, but Fakroun missed out. Instead, all the action came from neighbouring Algeria, as Khaled, Cheb Mami and others introduced the world to the North African sound known as rai music. And that seemed to be that, until about a year ago. Then a New York-based DJ known as Prince Language unearthed an old Ahmed Fakroun track called Soleil Soleil, re-edited it and put it out on a 12-inch single, renamed Yo Son. "Prince Language delivers an edit of an 80s obscurity that sounds like it could have been an outtake from Talking Heads backing an Arabic R&B group," said one. A few months later, some French DJs working under the name of Les Edits Du Golem released a 12-inch EP featuring a tune called Pyramide - in reality, a re-edited version of Fakroun's 1977 single Nisyan. Even though neither record was authorised by Fakroun, he was grateful for the renewed exposure. "I was very happy that these tracks are still alive in people's minds," he says. "Thanks to those DJs from all over the world, playing and re-editing and refreshing those tracks. No, I don't mind. It's good for me to hear them in a good re-edit or mix, as long as they respect copyrights" Amended and edited from bbc website 14/06/2008
  • Shalinrad
A very interesting read. Many thanks.